John Smyth

A Solution to Provide Nonverbal Autistics with Gen Ed School Credits

By John Smyth, © 2015 Education Overview The number of nonverbal autistics is growing [1 in 68 children; 1 in 42 boys]. The professional organizations consider them incompetent and deny them a general education. The parents spend time and resources fighting for their child’s rights, usually without success. The public schools are: Not equipped to…

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Authentic John’s First Book Soon to be Released

Saved By Typing’s own “Authentic John” Smyth is just about ready to publish his first book, “From Autism’s Tomb.” In it, John reveals life secrets from the profound Silence that holds us all. These secrets shape every person’s reality and potential. Yet most of humanity is unaware of them because of the depths of isolation…

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The Lost Gift, A Poem By John Smyth

The Lost Gift By John Smyth Wanting personal communication was lost in isolation and will wait with suffering. Each sadly wailing parent only appreciates in silos of grief longing for the child in another silo longing for them, separated waste assumes as human thinking shapes all silos. Your child waits in the same wanting waiting…

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Facilitated Communication Typers Receive HS Academic Letter

John Smyth Earns Academic Letter from Brownsburg High School

John Smyth, the son of SBT’s Program Director Jim, recently received an Academic Letter from his high school in Brownsburg, IN. Letters were given to all students who earned a 3.8 average or higher for the first three grading periods of the school year. John, a non-verbal autistic, began typing in December of 2010, at…

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Video: Laura Poorman on Facilitated Communication and Supported Typing: Answers to Key Questions

Facilitated Communication Trainer Laura Poorman discusses facilitated communication and supported typing with John Smyth.   [dt_divider style=”thick” /]   Answers to Key Questions About Supported Typing (Feb. 25, 2012) Read the transcript of this conversation below the video.   [dt_divider style=”thick” /]   Transcript: Laura Poorman Answers John Smyth’s Questions John: The understanding I have…

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Typer John Smyth has Essay Posted on Science Fiction Blog

Our own John Smyth had one of his essays, Are we fundamentally good or evil?, posted on Sci-Fi Bloggers.com, a blog normally dedicated to all things science fiction. As blog editor D. Alexander said in his introduction, “There are times when we are sent something written by a fan of the site, or someone simply…

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Skype Video Conferencing Technology Expands Autistic Typers’ World

On Friday afternoon, January 24, 2014, an extraordinary event occurred when a 21st Century technology helped expand the world a bit for four people affected by autism that struggle daily to communicate and find acceptance in the “normal” world. For the first time, nonverbal autistic typers Todd Washburne, age 47, Joe Kelly, almost 19, Josh…

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Facilitated Communication: Tracy Thresher & John Smyth at 2011 ICI Summer Institute

Supported typers Tracy Thresher, co-star of the documentary Wretches & Jabberers, and John Smyth use supported typing to have a conversation at Syracuse University’s 2011 Institute of Communication and Inclusion Summer Institute: Connection, Communication, and Creativity. A true example of Facilitated Communication in action! This is the first time Tracy and John had an opportunity…

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Autistic Typer’s Poetry Reviewed by Bestselling Author Don Mann

John Smyth is a nonverbal autistic who, until recently, had no ability to communicate with anyone – parents, doctors, educators, siblings. As with many similarly afflicted individuals, John, a highly intelligent young man, was diagnosed as having a 3 year old’s mind and warehoused by his local school system in “life-skills” training until he was…

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The Ember, a poem by John Smyth

Click to watch video: "The Ember" by John Smyth

The Ember by John Smyth When all I could lamely autistically do was open my mouth and make sounds that made no sense and behave in ways that were inconsistent with what a normal person would think or do, my autism looked as if it was what defined me and was all I might ever…

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